Sabzi Korma

May 18th, 2010

Vegetables in a Creamy Curry Sauce

Kormas and nut based creamy sauces are the Persian influence in India. This one is a curry from Kashmir the Northern most part of India.

I Green Bell pepper cubed

1 Cup Onions Chopped

1 Jalapeno sliced

4 Cloves garlic peeled and minced

4 Cups Frozen mixed Vegetables, Peas, Carrots Beans and Corn

1 Cup Tomato Paste Read the rest of this entry »

Daal Makhani

May 18th, 2010

Lentils in creamy style

Daal Makhani is a favorite lentil delicacy from Punjab, North India. Any Indian full course dinner or lunch must have some type of lentil in the menu. Lentils are cooked into a spicy gravy and are used as a dipping for flatbreads or to spread over rice. Lentils can also be soaked and blended into a puree and fried as appetizers. In South India lentils are soaked, ground and mixed with rice powder to make crepes. These crepes are called Dosas or they may be filled with spicy potato filling and rolled into Masala Dosas or spicy crepes. Lentils are an excellent source of protein and each state in India and each village cooks them in their own special way. When you visit an Indian Grocery store you will see many different varieties of the lentil. These lentils are also available at Asian or Far East markets. Today’s lentil recipe will use three different types of lentils.

1 Cup Urad Daal whole or Kali Daal or Black Lentils whole and not split available at Indian Groceries

½ Cup Split Mung Bean Daal also available at Indian Grocery stores

½ Cup Chana Daal or split Chickpea Lentils available at Indian or Asian Grocery stores

1 Tsp. Turmeric Powder

½ Tsp. Cayenne Pepper Powder Read the rest of this entry »

Aloo Gobi Matar

May 18th, 2010

Potato Cauliflower and Peas from Madhya Pradesh, middle side of India

This is a very simple and tasty vegetable. This can be served with Basmati rice or with Indian flatbreads.

2 Cups Potatoes peeled and cubed

2 Cups Cauliflower Florets

1Cup Peas

4 Tbs. Cooking Oil

1 Tbs Whole Cumin Seeds

1 tbs. Jalapenos chopped Read the rest of this entry »

Aam Aur Lasoon Chi Tikhat

April 4th, 2010

Mango and Garlic Hot Chutney

The State of Maharashtra in India with its capital city Mumbai faces the Arabian sea and is famous for seafood dishes. Coconut is an essential ingredient in Maharashtrian cooking. The food is mostly cooked in peanut oil and most of the curries are spicy and tart from chilies and tamarind. The thing that makes Maharashtrian food different from food cooked in other states is the use of dry roasted and ground nuts, like peanuts and cashews and sesame seeds. This is fresh chutney that can be served with dinner as a condiment.

2 Cups Green Mango peeled seeded and chopped. This is a tart variety of mango available in Indian and Thai groceries in spring and summer. If unavailable, you can substitute with any hard mango from grocery stores. Read the rest of this entry »

Doodh Pak

April 4th, 2010

Rice pudding from Gujarat

The vast land area and the differences in climate in the State of Gujarat have contributed to the different variety of food and cuisine. Gujarat is one of the few states in India where many different and flavorful vegetarian dishes can be found. Gujarat cuisine has a number of desserts which are different from the desserts of other states, but since rice is more or less the staple food of India, each state has it’s own method of preparing rice pudding. “Doodh Pak” is rice pudding from Gujarat. I got this recipe in course of my travels to Porbandar and Bhavnagar in Gujarat.

4 Cups Whole Milk

1 Cup Basmati Rice Available at Indian or Thai groceries.

11/2 Cup Sugar Read the rest of this entry »

Salaat Chole Nariyal Ki

April 4th, 2010

Salad made with Garbanzo Beans and Coconut

I learned this recipe during one of my visits to Pune, Maharashtra.

1 Cup Dried Garbanzo beans soaked overnight in warm water and drained.

1 Cup Carrots sliced thin

1 Cup Tomatoes chopped

1 Cup Red Onions thinly sliced

3 or 4 Hot green chilies sliced thin

1 Cucumber sliced thin

1 Cup Diakon or White radish thinly sliced

1 Cup Cilantro chopped

½ Cup Mint leaves chopped fine

1 Lime juiced Read the rest of this entry »

Thair Chaadam

April 4th, 2010

South Indian Yogurt Rice

4 Cups Overcooked Rice (Cooked until it is soggy)

1 Cup Plain Yogurt

1 Tsp. Mustard Seed

2 Cayenne Peppers, dried (or 1 Tsp. Crushed red pepper)

1 Tsp. Black Gram Lentils (available in Indian and Thai grocery stores, goes by the name of Urad Daal)

1 Jalapeno, chopped fine

10-12 Curry leaves, fresh or dried Read the rest of this entry »

Tandoori Murg

April 4th, 2010

Tandoori Chicken or Murg Angar (Chicken on Fire)

The Indian Independence Act was passed by the British Parliament in July of 1947. This act ended the British rule of India and provided for the partition India on August 15th 1947. On August 15th two independent countries were created, India and Pakistan. The state of Punjab was divided in half, West Punjab going to Pakistan and East Punjab joining India. Almost six million Hindu and Sikh refugees streamed out of West Punjab and into India carrying they personal belongings, their famous Clay Ovens called Tandoors and their extra ordinary cuisine. Tandoori cooking was like a hurricane that swept through New Delhi and spread over all of India.

The secret is to marinate the chicken in the spices overnight or for at least four hours. Then the chicken is cooked very hot, very fast. Read the rest of this entry »

Pork Vindaloo

April 4th, 2010

A little bit of Vindaloo history:

In 1509 the Portuguese explorer, Alfonso de Albuquerque came to India. He captured Goa a tiny state on the West Coast of India, from the Sultan of Bijapur and made it the headquarters of the Portuguese Empire in India. The Portuguese controlled the whole of India’s export trade to Europe for more than a century. The Portuguese introduced chili peppers, potatoes, coffee, tobacco and Christianity to India. Goa became a Portuguese colony and is about one third Christian to this day.

Vindaloo is a very hot and sour dish developed by the descendants of the Portuguese. Goa is known for its fiery Pork Vindaloo. Goa is one of the few states in India where pork is commonly consumed. This dish use to be taken on sea voyages hence there is no water used in it, and the vinegar acts as a preservative. The word Vindaloo comes from the Portuguese word Vin, meaning vinegar and Alho meaning garlic.

Vindaloo Masala

8 Dried Red Cayenne peppers

20 Black Pepper Corns Read the rest of this entry »

Roma’s Yoga of Food, Ayurvedic Cooking

February 21st, 2010

The natural healing cuisine of India

“Ayurveda” or the science of life is the ancient medical system of India and existed since about 5000B.C. There are four religious doctrines discovered many years ago in India. They are the Rig-Veda, Sham Veda, Yajur Veda and Atharva Veda. The Ayurveda is contained within the Atharva Veda. Ayurveda is based on firstly a belief in God. The healing system is based on love.

According to Ayurveda, there are three major life forces in the body called the three biological humors. In Sanskrit they are called Vata, Pitta, and Kapha and are also known as the “Tridoshas”. They again relate to the elements of air, fire and water and is the basis for the treatment of both physical and psychological constitution. There is also the three “Gunas” or qualities called Satya, Rajas, and Tamas. The biological humors are the root of this ancient healing system.

 Ayurvedic science of food and diet is a tremendously large field and influences every aspect of one’s life. In Chinese medicine there is reference to Yin, Yang and Chi or blood to be the primary elements in the body. In European Medicine it refers to as the Bile, Blood and the Phlegm. In Ayurveda “Purusha” means male and “Prakriti” translates as female. The “Tridoshas” Vata Pitta and Kapha as discussed before are the dynamic principles that govern the body, mind, and consciousness. Read the rest of this entry »